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JASPER JOTTINGS Week 23 – 2008 JUNE 08

http://www.jasperjottings.com/2008/jasperjottings2008WEEK23.htm

Index

JNEWS: Erasmus, Jenny (MC2008)
MFound: Assistant Sports Information Director
JFound: Jasper Dancers 2008
MNEWS: the “big chilli” Maria Disavino, an MC chemistry professor pictured in Jasper Magazine
JFound: Calimano, Michael (MC1968) (on FACEBOOK)
JFound: Baird, Bob (MC1972?) on his time as Quadrangle editor
ADMINISTRIVA: FACEBOOK eliminated “networks”; MC was one of them
MNEWS: The college’s new president, Brother Thomas J. Scanlan
JObit: Daly, William John (MC????)
JNEWS: Amolegbe, Oluwadamilola AKA Wadami, or ‘Dammie’ (MC????) moving back to Africa, Nigeria
JFound: Ward, Emilia (MC2008) assistant coach Adrian College women’s lacrosse
JObit: McMillan, Eugene (MC1950)
JFound: Cully, Tom (MC1977) MSC’s very first account manager
JObit: Boyle, John Vincent (MC1948)
MFound: “Jasper” Ronnie’s National five minutes of fame
JFound: Webb, Joseph [MC1978] memories include Haggerty, Ed (MC1950)
JFound: Enright, Joe (MC1968) (on FACEBOOK)
JFound: Maybe? Can we save Jack Taylor from oblivion?
ADMINISTRIVIA:Plaxo group – Jaspers of Manhattan College
MFound: tribal dance in progress … Manhattan College
Comment on JFound: Webb, Joseph [MC1978] memories include Haggerty, Ed (MC1950)
Comment on MNEWS: the “big chilli” is Maria Disavino, a professor of chemistry at Manhattan College by Tom N

JNEWS: Erasmus, Jenny (MC2008)

http://www.norwichbulletin.com/lifeevents/x1218085186/College-Graduations-June-1

College Graduations, June 1

Norwich Bulletin

Posted Jun 01, 2008 @ 12:00 AM

***Begin Quote***

{Extraneous Deleted}

JENNY ERASMUS of Colchester was one of nearly 700 students who graduated from Manhattan College in Riverdale, N.Y., this May.

{Extraneous Deleted}

***End Quote***

Erasmus, Jenny (MC2008)

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* Posted on: Sun, Jun 1 2008 10:46 PM

MFound: Assistant Sports Information Director

http://ncaamarket.ncaa.org/jobdetail.cfm?job=2892583

***Begin Quote***

Assistant Sports Information Director POSTED: May 16

Salary: Open Location: Riverdale, New York

Employer: Manhattan College Type: Full Time – Experienced

Category: Sports Information Preferred Education: Masters

Description

Manhattan College, an independent Catholic coeducational institution in the Lasallian tradition, located in the Riverdale section of NYC, seeks a full-time Assistant Sports Information Director. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to, preparing news releases and feature articles; distributing information to local, state and national media; serving as on-campus host for intercollegiate athletic events and coordinating media coverage for those events; designing, writing and editing game programs, schedule cards, media guides and other promotional publications for athletics; maintaining athletic records and statistical files; maintaining and updating the athletic website; promoting individual athletes for post-season honors; the supervision of graduate assistants and work-study students as well as administrative duties and any additional duties assigned by the sports information director.Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. We are committed to a diverse workforce. An AA/EO Employer M/F/D/V. Please send cover letter, resume, and reference list to: Vicki Cowan, Director of Human Resources, Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY 10471, email: humanresources@manhattan.edu. Application materials will be accepted immediately until the position is filled.

Requirements

A Bachelor’s degree is required, Master’s degree preferred with a minimum of 3-5 years of sports information experience. Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, PageMaker, Quark, Statcrew, and web applications are also required.

***End Quote***

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* Posted on: Mon, Jun 2 2008 6:06 PM

JFound: Jasper Dancers 2008

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=510222298582

[JR: Jaspers are looking better and better every year! FOWG ALERT!! Old Jaspers need to fill out a release before watching. It’s not how you remember it. Heck, it’s not how I remember it.]

###

* Posted on: Mon, Jun 2 2008 7:08 PM

MNEWS: the “big chilli” Maria Disavino, an MC chemistry professor pictured in Jasper Magazine

Buried inside the Jasper Magazine, she’s pictured on CNN. I can see the attraction. I’ll look to see if the CNN site has her video up. Good thing, she wasn’t teaching that when I was there. I might have gotten a D. Oh yeah, I did get a D! That ended my brief flirtation with ChemE. :-)

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* Posted on: Mon, Jun 2 2008 7:27 PM

JFound: Calimano, Michael (MC1968) (on FACEBOOK)

REPORTING FROM THE FACEBOOK DESK

IN THE JASPER JOTTINGS NEWSROOM

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=528686623&ref=mf

Michael Calimano

Poughkeepsie, NY

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Calimano, Michael (MC1968)

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* Posted on: Mon, Jun 2 2008 8:52 PM

JFound: Baird, Bob (MC1972?) on his time as Quadrangle editor

http://www.lohud.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2008806030407

Witnessing history during 40 years in a newsroom

By Bob Baird

Journal News Columnist • June 3, 2008

***Begin Quote***

Whenever I visit community groups to speak about the newspaper and my career, I point to three stretches of time as those that shaped my working life.

{Extraneous Deleted}

This month in 1968 – a full 40 years ago – marked the end of my first semester as editor of the Manhattan College Quadrangle, the older of two competing newspapers on the campus during the Vietnam War era.

It was an incredible year to be editor of a college newspaper and we squeezed every drop of ink we could from the experience.

For a few years leading up to my editorship, the newspaper had been increasingly critical of the college administration, the leadership of New York City and the administration of President Johnson.

My tenure wasn’t much different, except, perhaps in intensity.

We were still trying to figure out how to make our headlines fit and how to pay the printing bills when the U.S.S. Pueblo was seized by North Korea in January. If we even mentioned the incident, I couldn’t find it looking back at a bound volume of my four years of college newspapering.

But there would be plenty more to comment on throughout one of the most unbelievable years in recent American history.

By the end of the month, the North Vietnamese had launched the Tet Offensive, pumping up the confrontation and the casualties in a war many already thought had gone on for too long.

Somehow, that, too got lost in editions dominated by news of a student government committee working on a plan to begin course and teacher evaluations, something that would be thwarted by the “unwillingness of the administration to cooperate.”

Students were meeting in New York City to plan a drive to drop the voting age from 21 to 18, something that wouldn’t happen until after I was out of school and married.

There had been some relaxation of the mandatory jacket-and-tie dress code, but students and the administration were still struggling with questions about whether jeans were appropriate.

After months of anticipation, Robert F. Kennedy announced in March that he would make a run for the White House and Johnson announced he would not.

Ads in the college paper that month offered eight days and seven nights in Bermuda – including jet airfare and “deluxe” accommodations – for $185. Of course, that was about a fourth of the year’s tuition.

While we were on spring break, Martin Luther King Jr. was slain in Memphis. Watching the grief and violence that followed, we had no idea it was open season on men who were revered for their sense of justice and equality.

A frequent contributor during that semester was a writer named James Patterson. Back then, he was trying to make sense of war, assassination and presidential politics. But you may have read more of his most recent work.

Listed in the staff box back then was a student named Jeff Canning, from Tarrytown. Several years later, I was hired as an overnight copy editor in the White Plains office of what was then Westchester-Rockland Newspapers, a job Canning had held a year earlier. We worked for the same company until this past February, when Jeff retired.

Also listed in that staff box was the managing editor, L. John Durney III, who would become editor after me in January 1969.

He’s now provost and vice president for academic affairs – and teaches journalism – at St. Thomas Aquinas College.

Maybe we were lucky or just profited in an indirect way from Vietnam. As Manhattan gave students and Student Government a greater role in decisions, our budget was slashed to help finance the newer, less critical voice on campus. But we were able to publish half again as many editions as the previous year because of recruiting ads from large corporations – including some defense contractors – courting Manhattan business and engineering graduates.

It made it possible for us to cover the track team’s refusal to run in the annual New York Athletic Club track meet at Madison Square Garden in protest of the club’s racial barriers.

We had published our last spring edition in late May and were working our summer jobs when violence struck again – 40 years ago this week – with the assassination of a second Kennedy brother.

That August, several of us attended the United States Student Press Association’s national conference at Valparaiso University in Indiana, meeting Kurt Vonnegut, comedian-turned-social activist Dick Gregory and futurist Alvin Toffler. We also met student journalists from Alabama and Mississippi who were covering civil rights leaders while we watched from the sidelines. One night while we were there, we watched the bulletin come across the AP wire announcing the Soviets had rolled into Prague.

We all passed through the armed camp of Chicago just three days before the Democratic National Convention erupted in riots in the streets and even on the convention floor. We watched Dan Rather get roughed up by Mayor Richard Daley’s goons and wondered if we would someday find ourselves holding dangerous ground to do our job.

We saw Manhattan through its first civil rights, anti-war and pro-Nixon demonstrations and met and covered speeches by Nelson Rockefeller, Urban League head Whitney Young Jr. and the Rev. Ralph Abernathy of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Durney wrote extensively about student unrest at Columbia University and we even made friends with student editors at our rival, Fordham University, when they came under fire.

When we weren’t paying $3, $4 or $5 to hear the Moody Blues or Richie Havens at the Fillmore East, we were rooting for the student-run club football team, which we hoped might someday be sponsored by the college, as happened at Fordham.

During the fall semester, we chimed in on the college’s need to address a lack of diversity on campus and on issues like school decentralization in New York City and the emerging human tragedy in Biafra. Richard Nixon was elected that November, just a week after Johnson ended the bombing of North Vietnam.

And, after a year of violence and turmoil, three astronauts beamed back images of Earth from outer space while reading from Genesis on Christmas Eve.

My year as editor was over, but my career path was set. A full 40 years later, if I walk back along that road, 1968 remains a crucial milepost.

***End Quote***

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Baird, Bob (MC1972?) on his time as Quadrangle editor

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[JR: Wow! I don’t remember two newspapers on Campus?]

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* Posted on: Tue, Jun 3 2008 6:06 PM

ADMINISTRIVA: FACEBOOK eliminated “networks”; MC was one of them

REPORTING FROM THE FACEBOOK DESK

IN THE JASPER JOTTINGS NEWSROOM

http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/06/03/another-casualty-of-the-facebook-redesign-network-pages-to-be-discontinued

Another Casualty Of the Facebook Redesign: Network Pages To Be Discontinued

Erick Schonfeld

*** begin quote ***

Facebook doesn’t think a social network needs to have Network Pages. And maybe it doesn’t. I didn’t even know they existed until someone told me they are about to be killed.

When you join Facebook, you can also join certain sub-networks tied to where you live, went to school, or work. Those are being replaced by Groups, although any networks you already belong to will remain intact. You just won’t be able to see the activities on that network where members do so today, which is the Networks Page.

*** end quote ***

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I can confirm that they are in fact gone.

Take gun, insert bullet, pull trigger, and shoot yourself in the foot.

The big draw to Facebook was to gather alumni in a network. It did it automagically keyed to the email address. And by virtue of that email address, it was authenticated. That was a unique feature that differentiated in from MySpace or that ilk.

A bad misstep imho.

I’m not sure that this doesn’t make Facebook indistinguishable from LinkedIn, MySpace, or something else.

Argh!

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* Posted on: Tue, Jun 3 2008 6:57 PM

JFound: Cody, Chris (MC2006) remembers Joba Chamberlain

http://manhattancollegebasketball.yuku.com/topic/977

LASTING IMPRESSION

EX-JASPERS REMEMBER FACING, DEFEATING JOBA

By DAN TOMASINO

***Begin Quote***

LEARNING CURVES: Joba Chamberlain is hoping his first start for the Yankees today does not end up like the 2006 NCAA tournament game where his Nebraska Cornhuskers lost to the Manhattan Jaspers and Chris Cody, 4-1.

LEARNING CURVES: Joba ChamberlainJoba Chamberlain image is hoping his first start for the YankeesNew York Yankees image today does not end up like the 2006 NCAA tournament game where his Nebraska Cornhuskers lost to the Manhattan Jaspers and Chris Cody, 4-1.

June 3, 2008 –

Chris Cody remembers the sunny afternoon exactly two years and one day ago, when he stared down Joba Chamberlain and won.

***End Quote***

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Cody, Chris (MC2006) remembers

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* Posted on: Tue, Jun 3 2008 6:59 PM

MNEWS: The college’s new president, Brother Thomas J. Scanlan

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=940DE6D6153DF930A15750C0A96E948260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all

Education; Manhattan College Seeks a New Kind of Student

Published: March 23, 1988

***Begin Quote***

For much of its 135-year history, Manhattan College was the bootstrap used by many blue-collar Irish and Italian families to achieve a better life. But as those groups continue to climb the social ladder, Manhattan College finds itself looking to to two new groups to survive and grow – children of the affluent and of the urban poor.

And it is not alone. Many small private colleges around the country have been jarred by a shrinking college-age population and a growing consumer savvy among prospective students who want more for their money.

***and***

The college’s new president, Brother Thomas J. Scanlan, installed last July, is the leader of the college’s attempt to change. To date, he is also the most visible reflection of that change.

***End Quote***

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[JR: “NEW”!?!]

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* Posted on: Tue, Jun 3 2008 8:36 PM

JObit: Daly, William John (MC????)

ACTIONABLE OBIT: Daly, William John (MC????) Vero Beach,FL EXPIRES 06JUN08

http://www.legacy.com/TCPalm/Obituaries.asp?Page=LifeStory&PersonId=110975261

*** begin quote ***

William John Daly

William John Daly, 86, died June 2, 2008, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach.

He was born in Yonkers, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 26 years, coming from Westchester County, N.Y. He served in the Marine Corps during World War II. Before retirement in 1981, he established, owned and operated Gehrhardt-Daly Cadillac in Brooklyn, N.Y. He was an executive of General Motors from 1949 to 1972. He attended Manhattan College and Columbia University.

He was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach. He was a member of and held a seat on the board of governors at the Winged Foot Golf Club in Mamaroneck, N.Y., for 58 years. He was a member of the Bent Pine Golf Club, Vero Beach; an active member and past president Vero Beach Duplicate Bridge Club; member of the Men’s Club at St. Pius X Catholic Church in Scarsdale, N.Y., and a member of the Scarsdale Volunteer Fire Department.

Survivors include his wife of almost 15 years, LeeAnn Daly of Vero Beach; son, William C. Daly of Wellington; daughter, Dedee Rumsey of Denton, Texas; stepson, Charles Seyler of Fremont, Ind.; stepdaughters, Sally Houck of Birmingham, Mich., Susan Bigger of Charlotte, N.C., and Marie Ann Miller of Chicago; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandson.

Memorial contributions may be made to the AIDS Research Treatment Center of the Treasure Coast, 2407 Okeechobee Road, Fort Pierce, FL 34950.

SERVICES: Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. June 5 at Strunk Funeral Home in Vero Beach. A prayer service will be at 6:30 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. June 6 at St. John of the Cross Catholic Church Vero Beach.

Published in the TC Palm on 6/4/2008.

*** end quote ***

Guestbook for your comments is at:

(None cited? But I guessed.)

http://www.legacy.com/StarLedger/GB/GuestbookView.aspx?PersonId=110975261

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Daly, William John (MC????)

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* Posted on: Wed, Jun 4 2008 9:36 AM

JNEWS: Amolegbe, Oluwadamilola AKA Wadami, or ‘Dammie’ (MC????) moving back to Africa, Nigeria

http://www.jamati.com/online/style/haute-magazine-exhibiting-a-taste-for-the-culturally-tempered

HauTe Magazine – Exhibiting a Taste for the Culturally Tempered

Fashionista, Wadami, of HauTe Magazine, shares her dream and views on Africa ‘in fashion’.

Interview by Grace Yama

Wadami – HauTe Magazine

***Begin Quote***

Oluwadamilola Amolegbe, AKA Wadami A. or simply ‘Dammie’, “has garnered a lot of respect amongst her fashion peers in the industry, and is often called the “Anna Wintour of Africa”. At just 21, she has written for various print & online magazines in Africa, and the US. Including, HauTe Magazine, FashionAfrica.com, Bella Naija, GIANT Magazine, True Love (babe) Magazine, and Genevive Magazine”.

Wadami talks to Jamati about having a passion for something, having a true sense of who you are and putting it all into plan.

Jamati: Hello Wadami, can you give us a little background of yourself: Were you born and raised in Nigeria?

Hello, I was born and raised in Nigeria. Did My primary and secondary education in Nigeria, then moved to the States to pursue accounting at Manhattan College where I also realized my passion for magazines.

Jamati: Where do you currently call home?

If you had asked me this three weeks ago, it would be New York! And I wouldn’t have dreamed of saying where I call home now is really my home, Nigeria. Just at the spur of the moment, without any plan, I decided I wanted to move back to Africa, Nigeria.

Jamati: Wow! Good for you! I am sure there is going to be even more exciting things from this move! You must have always been into fashion, do you have a formal background in fashion design?

I am not sure I will say fashion. Fashionable? Yes I have always been particularly ‘stylish”. My formal background is in print and online publications.

Jamati: You have definitely achieved a lot for someone of your age. Where do you get your drive and motivation from?

The fear of not living my life on my own terms motivates me and keeps me focused.

{Extraneous Deleted}

***End Quote***

Amolegbe, Oluwadamilola AKA Wadami, or ‘Dammie’ (MC????)

[JR: I’d usually skip this ‘fashion’ person but she did say ‘MC’ and accounting, so maybe. Hope so. Good people ar eneeded everywhere. Africa is a tragedy. Can anyone confirm?]

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* Posted on: Wed, Jun 4 2008 6:41 PM

JFound: Ward, Emilia (MC2008) assistant coach Adrian College women’s lacrosse

http://www.ncaa.com/lacrosse-womens/article.aspx?id=258516

Adrian: Emilia Ward Named Assistant Coach of Women’s Lacrosse Program

June 4, 2008

***Begin Quote***

ADRIAN, Mich. – Emilia Ward joins the Adrian College women’s lacrosse coaching staff as assistant coach beginning July 1, 2008. Ward is a recent graduate of Manhattan College earning her bachelor’s degree in communications with an emphasis in broadcast and corporate concentrations.

Ward played four years at Manhattan College, a Division I program, and excelled both on and off the field. She made the honor roll in all eight semesters and was named to the dean’s list four times. She also was a member of Lambda Pi Eta Honors Society for two years and served as the treasurer during her senior year.

On the field, Ward started all 14 games as a senior and registered three goals and 16 assists for the Jaspers. She also played in 10 games and started four times as a junior and had two goals and four assists. After each of the last three years, she has been named MAAC All-Academic.

Ward prepped at Farmington Hills Mercy High School and helped lead her team to a state championship in 2004. She earned First Team All-State honors as a junior and senior. She held her school scoring record of 58 goals in a season upon graduation. She also excelled in field hockey earning Honorable Mention All-State plaudits as a junior and senior. Ward also was a team captain on the ice hockey squad at Mercy as a junior and senior.

Ward has coaching experience at the Detroit Lacrosse Club during the summer months since 2005. She has also assisted at the University of Michigan women’s lacrosse camp (2007) and the Michigan State University women’s lacrosse clinic (2006, 2007).

***End Quote***

Ward, Emilia (MC2008) assistant coach Adrian College women’s lacrosse

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* Posted on: Thu, Jun 5 2008 6:00 PM

JObit: McMillan, Eugene (MC1950)

ACTIONABLE OBIT: McMillan, Eugene (MC1950) Cedar Rapids, IA EXPIRES 10JUN08

http://www.press-citizen.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080605/NEWS02/806050324/1079/NEWS01

*** begin quote ***

Eugene McMillan, 83

June 5, 2008

Eugene F. McMillan, 83, of Iowa City died Sunday, May 25, 2008, following a brief illness.

Funeral Mass will be celebrated Tuesday, June 10 at 11 a.m. at St. Wenceslaus Church with the Rev. Ed Fitzpatrick officiating. Burial with military honors will be at Oakland Cemetery. Friends may call Monday, June 9 from 4 to 7 p.m. at Lensing Funeral and Cremation Service, Iowa City, where a Vigil Service will be held at 6:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to Catholic Relief Services.

Eugene was born November 6, 1924, in Brooklyn, NY, the son of James and Mary (McDonald) McMillan. On his 18th birthday, Eugene walked into a recruiting office and enlisted in the U.S. Army. He served aboard an Army vessel on the North Atlantic and in the Mediterranean as a radar operator during World War II before earning a bachelors degree from Manhattan College in 1950. On June 2, 1956, he married Sarah Marugg in Philadelphia, PA.

Eugene was an electrical engineer with General Electric Company for more than 40 years, with particular expertise in designing switchgear and high-voltage power distribution systems. His meticulous attention to detail and exacting standards of quality earned him recognition within his profession and responsibility for the safety and success of large-scale industrial projects.

He served as Scout Master for Troop 35 in Springfield, PA. In 1977, he and his family moved from Philadelphia to Burlington, IA. Eugene was an active member of St. Mary’s Church in West Burlington. In 2005, he moved to Iowa City.

Throughout his life, he held fast to his faith in God for guidance. He enjoyed his last few years, spending time with family – marveling at the beauty of his grandchildren and the flowering trees this spring.

Eugene is survived by his four children and twelve grandchildren; Stephen (Anne) McMillan of Denver, CO, and their children Matthew, Marcus, and Michael; Joseph (Liming) McMillan of Seattle, WA, and their children Jessie, Michelle, Alex, and Anthony; Rosemary (Peter) Persaud of Iowa City and their children Gabriel and Lily; and Daniel (Penni) McMillan of Iowa City and their children James, Patrick, and Thomas; his former spouse, Sally, of Albuquerque, NM; his sister, Sr. Mariella McMillan, of Rochester, NY; and his brother, Joseph McMillan, of Philadelphia.

Eugene was preceded in death by his parents; three siblings, Ella, Maureen, and the Rev. James; and two grandsons, Francis and Luke.

Online condolences may be sent to http://www.lensingfuneral.com.

*** end quote ***

Guestbook for your comments is at:

(none)

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McMillan, Eugene (MC1950)

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* Posted on: Thu, Jun 5 2008 6:12 PM

JFound: Cully, Tom (MC1977) MSC’s very first account manager

http://seekingalpha.com/article/80098-msc-software-corporation-business-update-call-transcript

MSC.Software Corporation (MSCS)

Business Update Call

June 3, 2008 5:00 pm ET

***Begin Quote***

{Extraneous Deleted}

I’m going to be introducing to you a gentleman by the name of Tom Cully. I, myself, have spent 12 years here at MSC and Tom makes me into a short-timer. Tom’s been at MSC for 22 years. He actually started his career in 1977 as he graduated with a civil engineering degree from Manhattan College. And Tom spent some time then, he spent his whole career in the CAE industry for that matter.

He initially worked in that as an analyst working in the industry, spent some time initially with us as a support engineer, and then he pretty quickly moved into a sales role because he found he was very good at talking about our products, articulating the value proposition around those. So since May of 1986 Tom has been an account manager.

He’s got one more unique distinction with respect to being an account manager at MSC. He happens to be MSC’s very first account manager. So you have a chance to talk today with one of the guys who’s the first one who had to deal with major accounts and has worked in this government industry sector for a long time.

One more thing that is very unique and very special about Tom as well. There’s probably plenty of things, but one that is interesting, hopefully to you, and that is that Tom’s lived with a quota for 22 years at MSC. And I’m sure he would be very happy to tell you that he has made this quota for the last 21 years of those 22 years. So he’s a very successful salesperson and has worked with some of our biggest accounts, United Technology, NASA. You’ll hear some of the other ones as we go forward here.

Tom Cully

Good afternoon, and thank you for that introduction. I am going to talk about our government group. I will talk more from a sales perspective and talk a little about the technology that the government is using through MSC. As we talked about, I’ve been in a number of positions at MSC. I got the pleasure of starting the government group about 2 years ago and received a new contract with the government. We actually got our start back in 1963 with a contract from NASA Goddard which led to our flagship product, Nastran. And that led to our other products including Patran and Marc have been heavily funded by the government.

Our group has grown steadily over the last two years. We have made our numbers, as Ted has mentioned, and the build side showed government at 5%. If you look at the Americas numbers, we’re sitting at about 14% of the business. Our largest customer is NASA. We sell both software and services to the government. In fact, in this building we have a secure facility to address government secure work as is required.

In the government there is great deal of complexity. It’s paperwork and regulation so we actually use a company called the Immix Group, they manage our GSA schedule, it stands for Government Services Agency. In order to do business with the government effectively you need to have a GSA schedule that can turn orders around in weeks as opposed to sometimes years.

So how big is the federal government? Of course it is the biggest consumer of goods on the Earth. Those numbers really are in trillions, so about $2.7 trillion is the budget for 2009, which is coming up for approval. Defense eats up a little more than half of that. Just from a perspective point of view, NASA is only $7.6 billion of the total $2.7 trillion, DOE is $25 billion. Even Homeland Security doesn’t exceed $35 billion. So you can see there’s quite a bit of money being spent elsewhere in the government.

In some information on the IT spend, the defense agencies spend about $32 billion on IT. As you can imagine, Army, Air Force, Navy, eats up quite a bit of that number. DISA, which stands for the Department of Information Assistance Agency, they essentially manage the IT for the government, comes in fourth. You have to come out pretty far on their scale, we do some work with DARPA, which is the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency besides the name services which I’ll talk about in a little bit.

On the non-defense side, or what are called the civilian agencies, as you can see the top getters are Health and Human Resources, the Department of Homeland Security, and you would be out five or six agencies before you would hit Energy or NASA. We actually do some work even with NSF, which is out on the energy scale.

Our focus is the government group but we really define governmental differently. The actual agency, federal, state, local, and their support contractors, so my group doesn’t cover anything with the prime contractor except with Boeing, Northrup Grumman, Lockheed, General Dynamics, and I have a chart coming up on that shortly.

We have a short-term and a long-term focus. Long term is really three years in the government, that’s how long it takes to secure funding for particular programs. We have four sales reps really focusing on these six agencies. As I said, NASA is our largest customer. We are selling both our legacy tools, the engineering products, as well as our enterprise groups, our new products, to the government.

Some of our long-term strategies really focus on government programs such as light-tactical vehicle and the new tanker project, the Constellation project at NASA. But we also work with the government universities and industry groups to look at other aspects, particularly where we can get future development of our products. That’s the University of Illinois, DARPAR, and the Council on Competitiveness for high-performance computing.

This is a list of the top contractors that represent the Washington technology group. The highlighted companies are the ones that we service. There is some overlap so the first chart up on the left there is for DOD. The others are covered by our other verticals whether it be aerospace or manufacturing.

On the NASA side we actually do cover some Lockheed and Boeing with the USA contract down at NASA Kennedy, California Institute of Technology is really NASA GPO. I was actually up there this morning and will talk a little bit about that later.

And on the bottom is our DOE top accounts and most of them are really managing DOE labs. For example, Lockheed Martin manages [inaudible]. So you can see some of these companies are getting their real fair share of the government budget. Some of the top getters are getting $30 billion.

As far as MSC goes, our three top accounts are NASA, DOD, and DOE. I will talk a little more about NASA but essentially we have about 48% of our business in NASA. We have about 31% in DOD, and about 15% in DOE, and then the balance is in other areas of the government. In the case of DOD we do pretty much split the revenue across the three services. In the case of DOE it’s mostly on the nuclear side where we have our business. The energy side is in renewable energy such as Lean turbines as well as nuclear are being typically funded as we move forward.

On NASA we are installed in nine of the ten centers. There are a few more centers which are satellite centers such as Wallops Island. The only center we are not installed in is Stennis. That’s really a test facility. Our largest NASA component is NASA Langley located in Hampton, Virginia. I mentioned I was up at JPL up in Pasadena this morning talking to them about some of the programs and the use of our products.

If you’ve been following some of the Mars mission, they just landed the PH Lander and it will be sampling soil on Mars. And what’s interesting about that, the robotic arm that they are using was actually designed using MSC.Adams. In about a year the new Mars robot will be out. It’s the size of a Mini Cooper. It was also designed with MSC.Adams.

As far as trends go, this is an election year, I don’t think anybody can miss that. It also has two wars going on. But this year the budgets are somewhat uncertain, both in 2008 and 2009. Some good news is that the government is quite interested in growing and modeling and simulation. And government defines modeling and simulation, everything from the battle field to, oddly, procurement cycles. We get involved in modeling procurement, try to predict what the government is buying, whether it will actually be commissioned. And we’ll talk a little bit more about that.

Some of the key areas of M&S at NASA is on the Constellation Program, which is their Moon-to-Mars program. They are coming up with a new vehicle to replace the shuttle, if you’re not familiar with the Orion program. Again, this is really focused on multi-discipline integrated analysis and our MD Nastran product really claims well here.

On the DOD side it’s all about protecting the war fighter and areas of impact of blast and we’ll show you a few examples of that. And DOD is unique in that it has not been able to test nuclear weapons for many years now so everything is virtual. We are developing massive amounts of data and we are working with a number of labs to try to manage that data for them.

Some other trends, the government is very interested in high-performance computing. They have an interest in consumer high-performance computing and they would like to see the masses using it as opposed to one or two. So we are working with the University of Illinois, the Council on Competitiveness, and DAPAR to try and bring top software, like ours, up to the high-performance computing world where we are supporting many cores and many processes.

Some of you have been at the PTC Conference. They are a predominant player in our space. Particularly in NASA and Army. They have two initatives ICE and ACE to drive product innovation within those two agencies supporting Constellation and future combat systems.

As far as competition goes, it’s really no different in the government space. We see the same players. One important difference is we do compete with the government. They tend to make decisions of make versus buy and we’re always trying to educate them to prevent them from doing the make.

Frankly engineering is important so we don’t sell ROI to the government, it’s all about reducing risks and meeting mission requirements. And finally, one of the biggest pushes that we see coming up in the next few years is DOD is going to fund quite a bit of development in the area of nuclear engineering to nuclear energy to drive software modeling and simulation in that space.

Here’s three examples. This one comes from the U.S. Army Picatinny Arsenal up in New Jersey. So anyway, the situation here is the Army is trying to look at fatigue on the fore fighter as well as coming up with more accurate weapons so our software MSC.Adams has been instrumental in these types of analyses. This particular analysis comes from U.S. Army Tacom, if you’ve been following the war issues in Iraq, one of the biggest threats is mines buried below the surface, so we’ve been modeling that particular problem and as you can see the orange box is the soil, the explosion occurs, the forces end up under the vehicle, and the whole idea is to minimize those forces. So that’s why we are now delivering MRAPs vehicles to the war saying they are supposed to [inaudible] Hummers.

The last one I will show you is with the Navy. It comes out of the office of Naval Research, particularly with the problems in shipping lanes today. Underwater explosions have become quite prominent, or concerns about underwater explosions. So, again, the previous slide was an example of our new capability in Nastran and R3, Solution 700. Here is another example where we have fluid suction interaction with the structure here.

That’s my brief presentation on our government activity.

{Extraneous Deleted}

***End Quote***

Cully, Tom (MC1977)

# # # # #

* Posted on: Thu, Jun 5 2008 6:38 PM

JObit: Boyle, John Vincent (MC1948)

ACTIONABLE OBIT: Boyle, John Vincent (MC1948) New Hartford, NY EXPIRES 07JUN08

http://www.legacy.com/UticaOD/Obituaries.asp?Page=LifeStory&PersonId=111002066

*** begin quote ***

John Vincent Boyle

New Hartford

John Vincent Boyle, 85, of New Hartford, passed away on June 1, 2008, with his devoted family by his side. John had lived the last three years in Natick, MA.

John (Jack) was born on January 15, 1923, in Garfield, NJ, the son of Francis and Anna Gentner Boyle. He was educated at Garfield High School and graduated at the age of 16. Jack was a starting guard on the 1939 undefeated Garfield High School football team which beat Miami High School in the Orange Bowl to claim a national high school championship. Jack attended Manhattan College on a football scholarship, but left school to enlist in the Navy after Pearl Harbor. He flew a Corsair fighter plane off the USS Intrepid, and won the Distinguished Flying Cross and multiple air medals for action in the Battle of Okinawa and attacks on Japanese military bases. In 1944, he married Irene Kral of Garfield, NJ, with whom Jack enjoyed a loving marriage until her passing in 2002. He was never the same after the loss of his beloved “Babe”.

After the war, Jack returned to Manhattan College and graduated in 1948 with a degree in civil engineering. He went to work for the New York Telephone Company, beginning his career as a cable splicer and rising through the ranks to ultimately become General Manager of the company’s Northern Division. He retired from the company in 1985.

Jack and Irene enjoyed many years of golf together at the Yahnundasis after his retirement. Jack served on numerous company and community boards, often as President. Boards included St. Luke’s Hospital, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, the United Way (Chairman), the Boy Scouts, Commercial Travelers Insurance Company and the Utica Chamber of Commerce.

Jack is survived by his beloved eight children. He leaves three sons and their families: Tim and his wife, Diane, of Philadelphia, PA, and their children, Jessie and Daniel; James and his wife, Judy, of Cincinnati, OH, and their son, Brian; and Brian and his wife, Martha, of New Hartford, and their children, Molly, Maddie and John. He also leaves five daughters and their husbands: Ellen and her husband, Charles Killilea, of Suffern, NY, and their sons, Charles, Jr., and Sean; Kathy and her husband, Andy Hold, of Rochester, NY, and their sons, John and Paul; Joan and her husband, Rick Willets, of Derry, NH, and their daughters, Kallie and Abbie; Mary Rose and her husband, Andy Fox, of Westborough, MA, and their daughters, Kaitie and Courtney; and Celine and her husband, Jim Foster, of Southborough, MA, and their children, Sarah, Caroline and Jack. He was predeceased by his grandson, Timothy Robert Boyle, in 1992.

A Mass to celebrate Jack’s life will take place on Saturday, June 7, 2008, at St. John the Evangelist Church in New Hartford at 10 a.m. There are no calling hours. Arrangements are being handled by the Dimbleby, Friedel, Williams & Edmunds Funeral Home, 13 Oxford Rd., New Hartford. Donations in Jack’s memory can be made to St. Luke’s Hospital.

Published in The Observer-Dispatch from 6/5/2008 – 6/6/2008.

*** end quote ***

Guestbook for your comments is at:

http://www.legacy.com/UticaOD/GB/GuestbookView.aspx?PersonId=111002066

# – # – #

Boyle, John Vincent (MC1948)

# # # # #

* Posted on: Thu, Jun 5 2008 6:45 PM

MFound: “Jasper” Ronnie’s National five minutes of fame

http://manhattancollegebasketball.yuku.com/topic/978

Ronnie’s National Tv Moment(s)

***Begin Quote***

Watching pandemonium at Baruch College last night following Hillary Clinton’s defiant, I’M-not-conceding-speech. Hillary and Secret Service wave into adoring crowds and while Tom Brokaw and Tim Russert are analyzing her speech, into the crowded picture comes “Jasper Ronnie.” He was dogged and determined to speak to Hillary and finally grabs her hand and can be seen shouting over crowd at her. Hillary politely moves on but undaunted Ronnie spots the ubiquitous Clinton fundraiser Terry McAuliffe and grabs his hand. Terry bows down to listen to Ronnie who is emphatically saying something as networks cut to St. Paul for Barack’s speech….hilarious

***End Quote***

[JR: That’s a great find!]

# # # # #

* Posted on: Thu, Jun 5 2008 6:53 PM

JFound: Webb, Joseph [MC1978] memories include Haggerty, Ed (MC1950)

http://members.whattheythink.com/allsearch/articleerc.cfm?id=34141

Thirty Years Ago This Date

FREE Marketing, Management and Economic Notes from Dr. Joe Webb

WhatTheyThink.com’s Economics and Research Center

Sponsored by MindFireInc.

***Begin Quote***

06/05/2008 – Today is a special day for me, my first day at work in the graphic arts industry, thirty years ago. Pardon the length of this posting… there is so much to remember from that day and week, some amusing, some mildly profound. It was a Monday, and started with a business trip, with the Friday to be the beginning of yet another new life, with the marriage proposal to the still Mrs. Webb, at Woodlawn train station in the Bronx. That story, is for another time, and will stay private.

I was still living at home, and my father drove me to LaGuardia airport in time for a 9:00am flight on TWA to St. Louis. I was to meet my boss, Ed Haggerty, the National Sales Manager for graphic arts film for Agfa-Gevaert at the TWA ticket counter. We would be getting a quick breakfast. When I arrived, I remember seeing Broadway star Carol Channing (“Hello, Dolly”) in the ticket area, her bags being brought in by a red capped luggage attendant.

I waited and waited for Ed, and he never came. I had met him twice before, so it wasn’t like I had missed him somewhere in the terminal. I dutifully boarded the flight to St. Louis, alone, not knowing exactly where I was going other than it was a trade show. I figured I could call the Teterboro office once I arrived. I later learned that Ed had done this before; he was known for cutting things close when it came to traffic, and not to take it as a snub. Every weekday, around that time, he was toughing out the commute from Syosset, Long Island, to Teterboro, New Jersey, still finding time to run in the morning prior to this daily adventure across the Throgs Neck and George Washington Bridges (he told me he took “Martha,” using an old New York area commuter joke, because he always found the GW’s lower level to be quicker to work). Since LaGuardia was a regular destination for him, this wouldn’t be a problem, he probably thought, but that morning, traffic worked against him. Somehow, at age 51, he still managed to look 41 despite the horrors of the commute.

Ed was a graduate of Manhattan College, as I was. When he worked in sales for Burroughs’ office equipment division in the early 1950s, back when single men were paid $55 a month and married men were paid $88 a month, an employment policy unthinkable today. To pick up some extra money his tall and slim stature helped get him some gigs as a model in a few print ads. That moonlighting ended one day when his boss saw him in one of the ads, picking him out of a group picture of executives that was a dress shirt ad, showing that they would stand out when they wore a premium dress shirt. Ed was in a back row, the only one in the picture who was smiling.

The time in Burroughs sales seemed to be formative for him, and loaded with anecdotes about his family. He loved to tell the one where his wife made him an extra special meal because he had gotten two orders that day. She didn’t speak to him for a couple of days after, he claimed, because he broke the news after the wonderful dinner that the two orders were from one customer and they were “get out and stay out.” Ed would eventually become Atlantic Region Sales Manager for Agfa until his retirement, and then would have a second career as VP of Sales for Superior Ink, a loyal and upright company man to the end, but always with the intent of creating good and long term customer relationships. There’s nothing like having six kids in the family, with four born in the space of 47 months, as an inspiration to keep your job.

I wouldn’t learn those things about Ed until much later, as I sat alone in a packed plane to St. Louis on my uneventful flight, still wondering where he was. I had only been on a plane two other times before, so the experience was still rather new to me. I arrived in St. Louis, got my bag, and luckily saw someone with an Agfa-Gevaert business card as their luggage tag. It was Fred Schoenbachler, the National Technical Manager for graphic arts film. Fred was one of those executives industry suppliers like Agfa-Gevaert had always needed. He had worked a while at World Color, leaving Agfa, but then returning, and was one of those codgers who could follow the company line but made it rough on the bureaucrats when toeing the line would jeopardize a customer. Fred was at ANPA for two reasons. First, to help get a new company product launched, with others, and to get a steak dinner one of those nights at Stan & Biggie’s a well-known steak house in town, founded by Stan Musial, one of the past stars of the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team, and regarded as one of the real class acts in sports and humankind. Evidently, Stan knew something about steak, too. I told Fred what had happened, and muttered something about Ed Haggerty’s skill to be the last person boarding a plane. Fred took me under his wing, and it wouldn’t the last time, as he’d look for ways to include me in things where I could learn about graphic arts films and the industry in my two-year stint at the company. He got me to the Breckenridge Pavilion hotel, and settled in. The rooms weren’t ready, but there was an Agfa-Gevaert contingent having lunch in the restaurant, so we went there.

They were having an ad hoc meeting, chatting about the business, the show, customers, and personal things. I sat next to Ed Manielli, who admired my selection of open turkey sandwich with cheddar cheese sauce and bacon bits. We chatted a bit, and about a year and a half later, Ed would become one of my bosses, and more like a mentor, even after I left the company, and he would move to GAF. He had served many roles he served in the company. I would later see that Ed was deep into the culture of the old Manhattan printing industry, one of the post-WWII executives who never went to college but was more innately astute than you would have been had you attended. There was a street smarts to the generation who worked in the trade and sometimes ended up in corporate positions. Agfa-Gevaert had many of them. Jim Massa, was one of them. He was a National Technical Manager based in Chicago, and started his graphic arts career in New York City. Out of high school, someone told Jim that you could make good money making camera color separations (the idea of a scanner hadn’t even been considered much less invented). Jim went into a color trade shop and lied when they asked him if he had experience. They threw him out by noon. He went to another shop that afternoon, figuring when they asked if he had worked some place making separations before, he could say with a straight face that he had. He supposedly worked in ten separation shops that week, a number embellished with time, I’m sure, staying in the final one two whole days before they caught on. Somehow he became a real expert in the science of color, and was of immeasurable value to sales representatives and their customers, with a keen understanding of the new color scanners that were coming to the market. This was a common story among the field personnel I met, and opened my eyes, despite my love of education that would result in the alphabet after my name, had me gravitate to them whenever I wanted to understand something about the business. I would later learn that many of them would have trouble articulating what they knew in their hearts and guts in the form or language of the executive organization, but they could always be depended upon for deeper insights into the practicalities of the print business and the psyche of print business owners.

I would eventually get to the show floor, escorted by some of the Agfa-Gevaert sales people who learned about Ed Haggerty’s stranding me with my itinerary. I had never been to a trade show before, and had never seen a trade show booth. The massive displays of company logos, other than Kodak, were of companies I had never known before. Harris? Compugraphic? What do those companies do? The Agfa booth was rather small, but contained a big vertical camera, with all kinds of attachments, to convert it to making color separations. It was a Frankenstein’s monster of a creation, in retrospect, but was created to support a new color separation process created by Agfa, called Transferlith. Somehow, the making of color separation positives, rather than negatives as used in the US market, was going to be a selling point. (Not!) The system was hard to use, and needed this patchwork of equipment to create the best selling opportunity. At the time, color scanners were usually $500,000, in 1978 dollars, though the price was heading down, it would still be out of reach for the great majority of newspapers who were, only then, experimenting with color.

That was the technical theme of the show: more color in newspapers. The idea was outlandish, but newspapers were heading in that direction, when Gannett’s grand USA Today experiment was nearly four years away. Newspaper color was bad, perhaps worse than that. The fact that it was usually out of register distracted one’s eye from the poor color reproduction. Some newspapers wouldn’t even run black ink in their process color, either because their presses couldn’t accommodate it for some reason, or the newsprint couldn’t handle that much ink. You ended up with browner blacks and blurry images, but like a child who just discovered the big box of Crayola crayons and was intent on using every one, they were just thrilled to have color images on the front page. Things have obviously changed since. Transferlith, it was hoped, would catch the process color wave (it didn’t; low-price color scanners did, just a few years later).

I walked the show floor a bit, learning about things like classified ad systems, something called “phototypesetting,” which was still pretty new then, and laser direct-to-plate, which would spend the next fifteen years being “only three to five years away” from really working.

On the days I was there, I felt more comfortable and took the shuttle (school buses) back and forth from the hotel to the convention center. I heard the driver talking with one of the passengers that he and his wife had finally completed their goal of visiting all fifty states. Most of the travel was done by car. Living in the near-center of the US in St. Louis made it easier. A few of the Agfa personnel who were unassigned to the booth made it over to the Gateway Arch for the ride up to the top to get a view of the city. I remember a man and his high-school age son in one of the elevator cars as he told him he helped build the Arch, and his son explaining that carrying cement bags around the construction site or something like it wasn’t really like building it, but it was no matter, as the pride of being involved in something so noteworthy couldn’t be diminished by the small nature of the task.

I’d like to think it was my idea that we take in a ballgame Tuesday night. After all, the ballfield was right across the street from the hotel. It was Busch Stadium, the old one, one of the multi-sport abominations with the Astroturf that ruined athlete careers and made eighty-degree days forty degrees higher if you were on the field. It’s since been replaced for the good of the fans and the players. Luckily it was a night game. The Reds were in town, and it was the era of “the Big Red Machine,” who were still worth seeing. I always thought it was strange visiting a ballpark that did not pay homage to my beloved Mets, almost like I was a stranger who interrupted a close family event. The Cardinals won.

The Wednesday night the show was all done, and in process of being torn down. I remember Myles Adler, the ad manager, who would later work at Panasonic, and Diane Cielo, who was his assistant, bringing me along with some others to a Mississippi riverboat for dinner. I was struck by how small the Mississippi seemed, as I grew up with the Hudson River and New York Harbor, a great expanse of water that seemed to define what a river was. Little did I know how narrow the Hudson was at various points north; what a sheltered life. I had a lot to learn.

Thursday was the flight back. Most of the Teterboro crew headed to Newark Airport while I was alone, again, on my way to LaGuardia. I saw Ed Haggerty in the morning, and we checked out of the hotel together. I had no idea I needed a credit card when I was traveling, and had assumed the company had arranged payment with the hotel. Ed pulled out his Diners’ Club card and put my hotel charges on it, reminding me that getting a card like American Express would be a good idea when I got back. We said goodbye and that I would see him on Friday morning.

When I got to LaGuardia, my parents and my unsuspecting girlfriend, Annie, waited for me at the gate. I could see them through the window as they watched the plane pull up to the terminal. It’s amazing how much air travel has changed in these 30 years. The Ed Haggertys of the businessworld can’t time their airport arrival to be 15 minutes before their flight, and now no one can meet you at the gate without extenuating circumstances. It was always nice to see spouses and family members, significant others, friends, and associates meet travelers at the gates, something that’s just not the same when they meet in baggage claim. There’s more built-up anticipation actually seeing the plane pull up to the gate and seeing the first passengers emerge.

The next day was Friday, and because Teterboro was on flex time (a still marvelous idea) the day was to end at 1pm. I left and headed to Manhattan to pick up the engagement ring. That evening, at around 6pm, in my car at Woodlawn station, she would say “yes,” just as her parents said she would two weeks before when I requested their blessing.

Since June 5 of thirty years ago, the industry and I, and Anne Nikl and I, through all the changes, challenges, and time, have been inseparable.

P.S. Here are some additional items related to my trip. Among the people staffing the Agfa-Gevaert booth were:

Ed Manielli (we still exchange Christmas cards), Pete Becker, John Sisson (who is now at Day International), Shelby Weinstein, Turner “Bill” Reid (who would later work for Dupont), Bob Topping, Barbara Richards, Dave Ditallo, and Dick Kashner. Perhaps some of the oldtimers remember these folks.

Al Coenen was the VP in charge of Agfa-Gevaert’s graphic division. His father set up the Gevaert Company of America during the Great Depression. He was always called “Mr. Coenen,” and we suspected even Mrs. Coenen called him that. When I announced I was leaving the company in May 1980, he was sincerely disappointed that I was going and we had a number of private chats about the industry and his experiences. One of them was about the Nazis marching in and taking over their production facility while he family was here in the U.S. People didn’t understand supply disruptions like that, he said, chuckling and somber at the same time. He retired from the company in 1978 and may have set a record for retirement dinners. He could still speak his native Flemish, but some executives in the European facilities had forgotten, so when they would huddle to discuss things when they thought he was out of earshot, he would know what was going on. He claimed to have never really told them that he wasn’t as perceptive about their actions as they thought. When I joined the company, they were putting in a new forecasting system, which was a real disaster. It nearly killed their business. He was a quiet man, and I only saw him dress down an executive once, and the rigid adherence to sticking with a broken system threw him over the edge that day. I never saw it done so well.

Though I was there only two stormy years, many lessons stick with me to this day. Some silly things do, too. Agfa ended each month on the 26th for some convenience of the European financial departments. Whenever I realize it’s the 26th, I still think it’s the end of the month. Being there at the time of the silver crisis, when it hit $80 in January 1980 taught me more about marketing and competitive strategy, good and bad, than I had realized at the time. It all started thirty years ago, this date.

Need help with your business strategy, market analysis and research? Talk to us about how Dr. Joe Webb and WhatTheyThink’s consulting services can help your company.

Need a speaker for your conference, open house or special event? Visit WhatTheyThink.com’s Speakers Bureau.

***End Quote***

Webb, Joseph [MC1978] memories include Haggerty, Ed (MC1950)

# # # # #

* Posted on: Thu, Jun 5 2008 8:40 PM

JFound: Enright, Joe (MC1968) (on FACEBOOK)

REPORTING FROM THE FACEBOOK DESK

IN THE JASPER JOTTINGS NEWSROOM

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1027984339

Joe Enright

is saving humanity, one day at a time

***Begin Quote***

Networks: New York, NY

Sex: Male

Relationship Status: Married

Looking For: Networking

Birthday: September 1, 1947

Hometown: Brooklyn, NY

Political Views: Other

Religious Views: Moderately apathetic Heightsian

Website: http://www.argyleheights.blogspot.com

Personal Info

Activities: Saving the world, one day at a time. Reading, writing, but very little arithmetic. I don’t know what I like, but I know art when I see it.

Interests: Various activities that I perform in a heartfelt manner that makes me very endearing. Did I mention sensitive?

{Extraneous Deleted}

Favorite Quotes:

“Sometimes I underestimate the magnitude of me.” – Reggie Jackson

“I suffered pain. I need law” – TV ad for 1-800-Pain-Law

“Tremble before me, mere mortals.” – Thor

About Me: One miracle short of being canonized a living saint and very humble, but in a matter of fact sort of way. Sure, I enjoy reading witty prose I have prosed, and playing beautiful music on my beautiful guitar, but let’s face it-all that artsy brainy stuff can’t compete with my new Porsche … Or is it a Mercedes? Since I am chauffeured at all times by my large retinue of assorted hangers-on or hanger-on’s as the case may be, who knows or cares? In any event, I am also a great philanthropist and give selflessly of my time to many worthy causes. For example, just last week I helped out in a soup kitchen for down and out victims of gnarly alien abductions.

***End Quote***

Enright, Joe (MC1968)

# # # # #

* Posted on: Fri, Jun 6 2008 7:25 PM

JFound: Maybe? Can we save Jack Taylor from oblivion?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_talk:Manhattan_College_alumni

***Begin Quote***

Category talk:Manhattan College alumni

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jack Taylor (19th Century Baseball Player) Alumnus Status

Greetings, all. My understanding is that it is not confirmed that “Brewery Jack” Taylor was an alumnus (or even a student) of Manhattan College. I believe some sources suggest that he may have been utilized by the Jaspers during some exhibition games of his time, but that College archives show no record of him ever having attended the school.

Of course, i’d love to be wrong! :) If anyone has sources indicating Taylor’s status as a student or alumnus of Manhattan College, please let me know! I’m assisting one of the leading researchers on Taylor, and would love to find anything indicating a formal connection between him and the College.

I’ll leave his article in the category for a time while the issue is open, and propose that we seek to either cite a source confirming his alumnus status (in his article or elsewhere) or remove him from the list if none can be found. I’m also very open to suggestions/corrections if there are more standard ways of handling cases like this; i’m just trying to be proactive. :)

Thank you and please let me know if there’s any other info out there!

An Earthshine 16:05, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

[edit] Jack Taylor (follow-up)

Hello again. It’s been awhile since i’ve checked in. Having not heard anything, i’m going to propose removing this category from the “Brewery Jack” Taylor article. If no one objects within a few weeks, i’ll go ahead and make the change. (I’ll also try to track down the user who added it to confirm, if i can.)

Again, i’d be very very happy to see any sources to the contrary, but i haven’t seen anything yet showing Jack Taylor’s status as a graduate or student of Manhattan College.

Thanks and please feel free to respond here or write me if you have any info on this.

An Earthshine (talk) 13:54, 28 November 2007 (UTC)

***End Quote***

[JR: Can we save Jack Taylor from oblivion?]

# # # # #

* Posted on: Fri, Jun 6 2008 7:52 PM

ADMINISTRIVIA:Plaxo group – Jaspers of Manhattan College

Jaspers of Manhattan College

http://jaspers.plaxogroups.com

FJohn68 DonParriott

# # # # #

* Posted on: Fri, Jun 6 2008 9:28 PM

MFound: tribal dance in progress … Manhattan College

http://spinsterdoesrome.blogspot.com/2008/06/june-6-2008.html

Spinster Does Rome

venerdì 6 giugno 2008

June 6, 2008

***Begin Quote***

Tonight’s video. This is what happens when you have people locked up in sessions for hours on end. A couple of nights ago I went to the lounge to get a soda and found this strange tribal dance in progress. I should point out it included people from Philadelphia, Saint Mary’s in California, Manhattan College and Mexico City. Crazy people.

***End Quote***

Sounds like Jaspers!

# # # # #

* Posted on: Sat, Jun 7 2008 6:16 PM

Comment on JFound: Webb, Joseph [MC1978] memories include Haggerty, Ed (MC1950)

By Dr Joe Webb

Greetings to all Jaspers. Ed Haggerty was class of 1950. Last I heard, Ed was still living on Long Island and enjoying retirement, and still looking 10 years younger than he actually is.

* Posted on: Fri, Jun 6 2008 1:52 PM

Comment on MNEWS: the “big chilli” is Maria Disavino, a professor of chemistry at Manhattan College by Tom N

By Tom N

I went to Manhattan College. I have seen Maria Disavino, and she is hot!

* Posted on: Tue, Jun 3 2008 11:19 PM

“Bon courage a vous tous”

-30-

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